Alien Minerals Discovered at Ancient Meteorite Strike Site in Scotland

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The discovery opens many questions. Is the same ejecta layer found elsewhere in the BPIP? Where exactly did the meteorite hit? Could the impact have triggered the outpouring of lava that began at the same time, or be related to volcanism in the larger North Atlantic Igneous Province? So far, Drake has collected samples from another site on Skye that also yield strange mineralogy, including another mineral strikingly similar to one found in comet dust.

Drake says he was surprised that the ejecta layer had not been identified before. After all, the Isle of Skye is famously well-trampled by geologists. The second site had not been sampled in years. As for the first site, Drake suspects the steep, rough, and very boggy terrain probably discouraged previous workers from sampling the layer. “We were sinking in up to our thighs. I distinctly recall saying to (co-author) Andy Beard, ‘this had better be worth it.’” Now, says Drake, “It was worth it.”

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